Archive for October 2008

October 21

October 21, 2008

On October 21 with workers still installing the seats at the Met Center in Bloomington, the North Stars played the California Seals to a 3-3 tie in their first home game ever. The key players behind Minnesota’s effort were Walter Bush Jr., a lawyer who co-owned Minnesota’s Central league team, Minneapolis Bruins; Gordon Ritz, a former Yale hockey player who made his money in the construction business and Bob McNulty, a popular broadcasting personality. Bush lured in additional investors from both Minneapolis and St. Paul to form a eight man team. With fierce competition from other bidding cities, including a rival bid from their home state, Bush and his team set out to convince the NHL’s Board of Governors to hand over one of the six expansion franchises. Despite the fact that the Twin Cites owned the smallest sized television market among the major applicants, the NHL must of felt that they couldn’t pass up on a community so rich in hockey tradition. On February 9th, 1966 they officially granted Minnesota an expansion team scheduled to begin play in the fall of 1967. Eventually, five cities St. Louis, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Oakland were also welcomed into the NHL. Talks began with the Metropolitan Stadium Commission on premise that an arena strategically placed between Minneapolis and St. Paul in the suburb of Bloomington , where the Twins and Vikings had already been successful, would be ideal for hockey as well. The commission was sold on the idea and agreed to the construction of the building, which would later be named Metropolitan Sports Center.

Thanks to Mr. Gunderson’s 6th grade class at Virginia-Roosevelt Elementary School for the research on October’s Day in History.

Thanks also to Minnesota’s Learn and Serve America Service Learning Program for their help.

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October 20, 1818

October 20, 2008

The treaty between England and the United States further established the international boundary along the forty-ninth parallel from the northwestern point of Lake of the Woods to the “Stony” (Rocky) Mountains. The 1818 treaty also directed how to tie in this new boundary from the northwestern point of Lake of the Woods to the forty-ninth parallel if the point was not on the forty-ninth parallel. The boundary line between Lake of the Woods and the forty-ninth parallel was determined by a survey in 1872, with the northwestern point of the lake being found in a marsh under several feet of water.

Thanks to Mr. Gunderson’s 6th grade class at Virginia-Roosevelt Elementary School for the research on October’s Day in History.

Thanks also to Minnesota’s Learn and Serve America Service Learning Program for their help.

October 19

October 19, 2008

Andrew O’Connor (1874-1941) was an American sculptor of monuments and portrait busts. Born in Worcester, Massachusetts, a son of a sculptor of the same name of Irish descent. He received various commissions for funerary and public monuments mainly in the USA, including the monument to Lincoln at Springfield, Illinois, an equestrian statue of Lafayette at Baltimore and the Theodore Roosevelt memorial at Glen View, Chicago. He also unveiled the sculpture of Minnesota’s first native born governor John A. Johnson.

O’Connor created the statue that is placed in front of the state capital of the first Minnesota-born governor John A. Johnson. Governor Johnson was the first to serve a full term in the present state capitol, and the first to die in office, John Johnson would still be remembered as one of the state’s most courageous and charismatic leaders. He also was the first Minnesota governor to bask, fleetingly, in the national spotlight when he sought the 1908 Democratic presidential nomination but lost to William Jennings Bryan.

He failed in early campaigns for state office from his heavily Republican home county but finally was elected to the state senate in 1898, indicating his growing bipartisan appeal. Elected governor three times—in 1904, 1906, and 1908—Johnson’s ability to reason and work with legislators of both parties resulted in such reform legislation as reorganization of the state’s insurance department to the benefit of policyholders, reduction of railroad passenger and freight rates, and removal of constitutional restraints on the legislature’s power to tax.

Thanks to Mr. Gunderson’s 6th grade class at Virginia-Roosevelt Elementary School for the research on October’s Day in History.

Thanks also to Minnesota’s Learn and Serve America Service Learning Program for their help.

October 18, 1881

October 18, 2008

St. Luke’s is a comprehensive care center that has built a reputation on providing quality care with compassion. Along with hospital care and services, St. Luke’s also provides primary and specialty care at clinics throughout the region. Hospital care, however, remains at the heart of our organization. Founded in 1881, St. Luke’s became the first hospital in the city of Duluth. While it has grown dramatically to offer the most advanced technology in treating patients, St. Luke’s has not grown too big to forget about personalized care and attention. They are committed to putting the patient first.

Today, St. Luke’s offers comprehensive trauma services, medical and surgical services. It also provides diagnostic and therapeutic services, community and regional services, and mental health services.

Thanks to Mr. Gunderson’s 6th grade class at Virginia-Roosevelt Elementary School for the research on October’s Day in History.

Thanks also to Minnesota’s Learn and Serve America Service Learning Program for their help.

October 17

October 17, 2008

The Phyllis Wheatley settlement house was founded and began operation in Minneapolis, Minnesota. These houses were designed to help “Americanize” the communities they served.

Its first director was W. Gertrude Brown. The settlement house had four departments: education, recreation, music, and dramatics. What were noticeably missing were classes in citizenship and English. This set the Phyllis Wheatley house apart from other settlement houses that focused on the “Americanization of foreigners.” A black woman ran each department and classes were structured for both children and adults. Though resistant to the idea of a settlement house in the beginning, African-American men and their groups changed their mind after the house opened. During the twenties and thirties “Phyllis Wheatley” as it was affectionately called became the center of the Minneapolis African-American community.

Thanks to Mr. Gunderson’s 6th grade class at Virginia-Roosevelt Elementary School for the research on October’s Day in History.

Thanks also to Minnesota’s Learn and Serve America Service Learning Program for their help.

October 15, 1967

October 15, 2008

It’s the Minnesota North Stars first game ever! The team took the ice losing expansion California Seals on the road. They played the Seals to a 3-3 tie in their first home game. Midway through the season the Stars where in the running for first place in the all expansion Western Division.

The North Stars continued to play solid hockey winning 40 games for the first time in franchise history led by Neal Broten and Bobby Smith who each scored a team high 77 points, as the Stars finished in 2nd place with a 40-24-16 record. Their colors are Green, White, Yellow, and Black.

Their logo is a Green N with a yellow outline pointing up to a yellow star.

Thanks to Mr. Gunderson’s 6th grade class at Virginia-Roosevelt Elementary School for the research on October’s Day in History.

Thanks also to Minnesota’s Learn and Serve America Service Learning Program for their help.

October 14, 1946

October 14, 2008

After the war of 1812, the American government took physical possession of the northwest frontier by establishing a chain of Indian agencies and supporting forts from Lake Michigan to the Missouri River. These outposts denied non-citizens commercial use of American rivers. In 1819, the 5th Regiment of Infantry arrived at the junction of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers to build this northwest link. Fort Snelling was completed in 1825. For almost 30 years, Fort Snelling was the hub of the Upper Mississippi and a meeting place for diverse cultures. Dakota and Ojibwe gathered at the fort to trade, debate government policy, and to perform their dances and sports.
By 1851, treaties had opened much of the new territory of Minnesota. Newer forts Ridgely, Ripley, and Abercrombie took over frontier duties while Fort Snelling was demoted to a supply depot. In 1858, Fort Snelling was sold to a land developer and was made a town site. Plans for the city of Fort Snelling were abandoned, however, with the outbreak of the Civil War.

Between 1880 and 1900, new barracks, officers’ quarters, and storehouses were built at the post while decayed buildings of the old fort were demolished. During World War II, Fort Snelling processed over 300,000 inductees and trained soldiers in duties from operating railroads to speaking Japanese. At war’s end, Fort Snelling finally closed.

In 1960, the U.S. Department of the Interior designated Fort Snelling as the state’s first historic landmark. Since then, both public and private funds have been used to rebuild the fort. Today, The amazing Fort Snelling History Center provides orientation films and different exhibits, while Fort Snelling State Park offers dozens of hiking trails and beautiful scenery.

Thanks to Mr. Gunderson’s 6th grade class at Virginia-Roosevelt Elementary School for the research on October’s Day in History.

Thanks also to Minnesota’s Learn and Serve America Service Learning Program for their help.

October 13, 1990

October 13, 2008

The most important thing in Minnesota that happened on October 13th was that KMR Architects opened the Target Center in Minneapolis on October 13, 1990.

It cost 104 million dollars for the construction. It is located on 600 First Avenue North. They have a stadium there that can fit between 13,000 to 19,000 people for most events! There have been many events held at the Target Center. The first event held in the Target Center was a game between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the. Dallas Mavericks in the opening year. Minnesota won 98 to 85. They have since remodeled it in 2004. It is still open and used for Timberwolves games concerts, conventions and many other activities for the public to enjoy.

Thanks to Mr. Gunderson’s 6th grade class at Virginia-Roosevelt Elementary School for the research on October’s Day in History.

Thanks also to Minnesota’s Learn and Serve America Service Learning Program for their help.

October 12, 1937

October 12, 2008

One of the most important things that has happened on October 12 is that Columbus Day became a national holiday. This happened in the year of 1937.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed the Columbus Day celebration to be on October 12th every year. Then, in 1971, Congress changed the date to the second Monday of October to afford workers a long weekend.

Thanks to Mr. Gunderson’s 6th grade class at Virginia-Roosevelt Elementary School for the research on October’s Day in History.

Thanks also to Minnesota’s Learn and Serve America Service Learning Program for their help.

October 11

October 11, 2008

The First Democrat elected after the Civil War, Grover Cleveland was the only President to leave the White House and return for a second term four years later.

President Grover Cleveland came to Minnesota on October 11th. One of nine children of a Presbyterian minister, Cleveland was born in New Jersey in 1837. He was raised in upstate New York. As a lawyer in Buffalo, he became notable for his single-minded concentration upon whatever task faced him. In 1862 with the Civil War being fought in the south, a Dakota uprising began in the western part of the state along the Minnesota River, precipitated by hunger caused by a crop failure in 1861 and long delays in the distribution of their annuity payments. As soon as news of the outbreak reached Governor Ramsey, Sibley was commissioned as a colonel and was placed in command of the emergency force on August 19, and by the next day he was moving up the Minnesota River on steamboat at the head of four companies of volunteers.

Thanks to Mr. Gunderson’s 6th grade class at Virginia-Roosevelt Elementary School for the research on October’s Day in History.

Thanks also to Minnesota’s Learn and Serve America Service Learning Program for their help.